Where is the i686 in rhel 7

RHEL 7 seems to have dropped installer / native support for 32bit Intel x86 machines. Only 64bit machines will be supported, and there is 32bit multilib support built in, so people can still run most 32bit apps.

So do we want to build a 32bit installer and os tree for CentOS-7 ? Can we find the people and resources ( mostly people, resources for an extra os tree are minimal in this case ) to be able to maintain that 32bit tree ? Large part of the answer would depend on what feature set we intend to support ( likely wont be a 100% cover of the x86_64 spec ), and what the real user demand for this is.

Update: Its worth noting that we might need to build a i686 tree in order to build the multilib components in x86_64 anyway.

- KB

12 thoughts on “Where is the i686 in rhel 7”

  1. Part of the problem is also that the i686 components included in the x86_64 tree need to be built – and there isnt enough 32bit userland to achieve that; so we are going to need chunks of i686 added into the build roots anyway.

    Similar to the ppc on ppc64 problem,

      1. at:

        %build
        # bugzilla #1044707
        export CFLAGS=”%{optflags} -lrt”
        # patch9 touches configure.in

        samba:

        # bugzilla #1046345:
        #global with_clustering_support 1
        %global with_clustering_support 0

        See also 1046276, 1046328, 1046334, 1046354, 1046357, 1046362, 1046363, 1046373 and 1046374.

        You’re in an easy place that only need i686 content for the x86_64. I need a full installer for my 32-bit laptop, plus a good chunk of epel7-i686 :(

        Note: the rpms in the link above are “dirty” with fc19 and are only usable as bootstrap. They will be clean if/when they are signed and the buildhost dosn’t have “hybrid” in its hostname.

  2. I find this interesting. Some of you folks are amazing. I’d never presume to tell someone ‘nah, you just stay on version x, you don’t need to upgrade’ or ‘why don’t you just upgrade your hardware?’. It’s about choice folks. RH is going into dangerous waters by deciding wholesale to lop off a whole platform. I have a colleague that has several hundred appliances in an industrial setting that are all 32bit. They do not need the memory footprint that x64 provides and these devices work great. He does want to upgrade to stay current (yes, the 6.x branch is supported for a while but that’s not the point). To me, it’s the attitude that is very troubling. Just because *you* don’t need 32bit or don’t have a use case you think that everyone else doesn’t either and don’t support having that as an option. Red Hat has made some very let’s just say interesting decisions that have caused a lot of problems for their user base.

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